Welcome. Here you find latest freeware and legal software as well as latest info about IT Technology.
In a perfect Android world, the main language of Java is really modern, clear, and elegant. You can write less by doing more, and whenever a new feature appears, developers can use it just by increasing version in Gradle. Then while creating a very nice app, it appears fully testable, extensible, and maintainable. Our activities are not too large and complicated, we can change data sources from database to web without tons of differences, and so on. Sounds great, right? Unfortunately, the Android world isn’t this ideal. Google is still striving for perfection, but we all know that ideal worlds don’t exist. Thus, we have to help ourselves in that great journey in the Android world.

Kotlin and Java - Android
Kotlin is a popular new player in the Android world. But can it ever replace Java?
What Is Kotlin, and Why Should You Use It?
So, the first language. I think that Java isn’t the master of elegance or clarity, and it is neither modern nor expressive (and I’m guessing you agree). The disadvantage is that below Android N, we are still limited to Java 6 (including some small parts of Java 7). Developers can also attach RetroLambda to use lambda expressions in their code, which is very useful while using RxJava. Above Android N, we can use some of Java 8’s new functionalities, but it’s still that old, heavy Java. Very often I hear Android developers say “I wish Android supported a nicer language, like iOS does with Swift”. And what if I told you that you can use a very nice, simple language, with null safety, lambdas, and many other nice new features? Welcome to Kotlin.

FreeOffice -  A complete office suite software which is alternative of  Microsoft Office. It is light, less in size and easy to use.


FreeOffice is completely freeware software for personal use as well as business use. 
"FreeOffice is a complete office suite with a word processor, a spreadsheet application and a presentation program – all compatible with their counterparts in Microsoft Office." 

While running a digital marketing agency, Neerav Parekh regularly updated his clients on their campaign performance with reports and charts that were carefully put together.
However, the clients were quickly snowed under the blizzard of data, and inevitably demanded that account managers personally visit them and take them through these reports.

This was a laborious process and, rather than plod through it repeatedly, Parekh, a serial entrepreneur, turned to artificial intelligence (AI), the science of trying to make computers think and act like humans, for a solution.

His product, Phrazor, is aimed at automating the process of interpreting data and communicating insights. Having used Phrazor for his agency, Parekh has now sought to extend the reach of his product.
"I realised its enormous potential to change the way data was understood not just in digital marketing but in every other sphere where data was being presented," he says.

"Every company has to send performance reports to its employees or customers. The focus of our venture is to help companies communicate the insights in their data to their people at scale."

For his 14-month-old firm vPhrase, Parekh has ambitious targets he eyes companies not just in India but also in the US and targets to be in the rest of Asia and Europe in three years. "There is a huge opportunity both in India and in other countries in the analysis and interpretation of data," he adds.

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